Home Africa News Mutare Man Fakes Parents’ Death in Bid to Lower Child Maintenance Payments

Mutare Man Fakes Parents’ Death in Bid to Lower Child Maintenance Payments

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In a surprising turn of events, a Mutare man reportedly fabricated his parents’ death as a desperate attempt to lower his monthly child maintenance payments.

Misheck Mangwana, a local tout, had been directed by the court to pay $35 per month for the upkeep of his child over the past two years.

The case unfolded at the Mutare Civil Court on Friday, where Mangwana and his baby mama, Precious Gombakomba, appeared before Mr Xavier Chipato.

Mangwana argued that he could not afford the $35 due to his newfound responsibility of caring for his two younger siblings following the alleged death of his parents last year.

Gombakomba, on the other hand, contended that the $35 she received from Mangwana was inadequate, given the prevailing inflationary environment and soaring prices of basic commodities. She revealed that Mangwana had previously paid the maintenance in local currency, which fell short of the court’s directed amount. She disputed Mangwana’s claim about his parents’ death, asserting that she had met them as recently in January.

Recounting her struggle, Gombakomba emphasized that she had been shouldering most of the financial burden for their child. She expressed her frustration at Mangwana’s lack of support and called upon the court to intervene, urging him to fulfill his responsibilities as a father. Gombakomba highlighted that Mangwana was gainfully employed and had the means to contribute adequately to their child’s upbringing.

In his defense, Mangwana maintained that he only earned $50 per month and could only spare $25 for the child’s maintenance, citing his obligation towards his younger siblings.

However, he failed to produce a phone number for the court to verify his parents’ alleged demise, explaining that his relatives did not possess mobile phones.
After careful consideration of the arguments presented, Magistrate Chipato ruled that Mangwana should continue to pay $35 per month for the maintenance of his child.

The court found insufficient evidence to support Mangwana’s claim regarding his parents’ death and reiterated the importance of fulfilling parental responsibilities.

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